Compound Sentences

Compound sentences combine two or more independent sentences into one with the use of conjunctions known as FANBOYS.  The two independent sentences are usually separated by a comma. The acronym stays for:

  • F– for
  • A– and
  • N– nor
  • B– but
  • O– or
  • Y– yet
  • S– so

Examples of compound sentences:


  • My father is at home, and my mother is at work.
  • More than one hundred people applied for the job, but only two were hired.

There are three types of compound sentences:

  1. The one that consists of two independent sentences separated by a comma and one of the FANBOYS conjunctions :  – More than one hundred people applied for the job, but only two were hired.
  2. Two compound clauses are devided by a semicolon (;). The idea is that two sentences are related to one another although there is no any conjunctions in the sentence. – Susan wrote a novel; she wrote it really well! NOTES: -do not use a comma instead of a semicolon! -do not use the first capital letter after a semicolon (Susan wrote a novel; She wrote it really well!) – do not separate the two independent clauses with a conjuntion (Susan wrote a novel, and she wrote it really well!)
  3. The third way of writing of a compound sentence is by adding a semicolon after which goes a conjunctive adverb which is between the two independent clauses: Susan wrote a novel; however, she didn’t write it well. Below are some of the conjunctive adverbs you can use:

2017 copyright Darija Radovanovic (London Calling Designs)

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply